Barely three percent of Gaza's drinking water wells is fit for human consumption, and the crisis is claiming lives.

by Sandy Tolan for Al Jazeera English (Part Two of a Two-Part Series)

Gaza - When it comes to survival in Gaza, safe, clean drinking water is not at the top of Mousa Hillah's list of priorities. 

 Mousa Hilleh, 48, rebuilt his home after the 2014 Gaza war and says not having access to clean water is a major concern [Abdel Kareem Hana/Al Jazeera]

Mousa Hilleh, 48, rebuilt his home after the 2014 Gaza war and says not having access to clean water is a major concern [Abdel Kareem Hana/Al Jazeera]

Since the 2014 war, Hillah, known to neighbours and family as Abu Ali, has had far bigger worries, which are etched deeply into the exhausted face of the 48-year-old grandfather.

Dodging shell fire from Israeli tanks, he fled with his family from the destruction of his Shuja'iyya neighbourhood, flattened by Israel in an attack so devastating - 7,000 shells in barely an hour - that it astonished even US military officials. ("Holy bejeezus!" one retired general exclaimed.)

The family took refuge for months in an in-law's house near the sea, along with 50 other people. When they returned, Abu Ali found his home - the one he had built after 30 years of working construction in Israel - utterly destroyed.

Brick by board, he rebuilt it, adorning his front entrance, in a dose of biting irony, with repurposed tank shells.

Click here to read the full story.